Blooming In The Front


Many of the plants in front of my basement apartment are budding, blooming, and otherwise being attractive and interesting.


This Abutilon seedling is a few months old but suffered greatly in my hands--it dried out a few times while I was away. But it's still deciding to flower, small and ill-formed though it is. I'm uncertain whether the colouring on the new leaves are actual variegation or just random chlorosis.

My Cyclamen 'Neopolitan' is flowering, too--and it looks like it could go head-to-head with a spiky Agave and win.

My Stapelia grandiflora has several buds developing yet again--this is the largest of the bunch.

My new Aechmea recurvata 'Blackie' is also blooming.

The whorl-leafed Achimenes 'Ambroise Verschaffelt' buds are starting to open! I'm quite a fan of it and certainly plan to start more rhizomes next year.

I had some Puya berteroniana I started from seed. One of them was an albino--it died before the rest did. Its death was probably due to lack of any photosynthetic food supply--the others died from water issues during monsoon season earlier this year, I suspect. This photo is weeks and weeks old--I recently rediscovered it.

One of my Schlumbergera has a siamese phylloclade--it has three "wings" instead of two. Some Schlumbergera can do that, Wikipedia says, although it's more rare, and my assumption is that it's more of a general growth habit than an infrequent occurrence. Most of the phylloclades on this plant are two-winged. And I really think this one is two multiwing phylloclades fused together--the bottom has four "wings" and the top has three.

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6 Responses to Blooming In The Front

  1. Do the Stapelia grandiflora flowers smell, bad? The Achimenes 'Ambroise Verschaffelt' is a very delicate pretty flower. Is that good luck with the Schlumbergera wings, if so, you should make a wish. :-)

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    1. When Stapelia grandiflora bloomed inside, no, it didn't smell at all. Out front? Rotting meat in sweaty socks. The flies are enjoying it!

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  2. Abutilons are in fact ridiculously prone to chlorosis (I was only ever able to keep mine green by dumping huge amounts of fertilizer on them all the time; I was never able to figure out what the exact deficiency problem was), but your picture looks to me more like drought stress or sunburn or something than chlorosis. Chlorosis on mine always manifested as green veins on yellow leaves, not yellow patches at the leaf edges.

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    1. Good to know about the chlorosis--and it's totally drought stress! It's only in a 2-inch pot that dries out every other day or so. So when I'm on vacation, it's a gamble hoping for rain! Although I almost wish it were actually variegation. It would have been darn cool.

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  3. Kenneth.. Have you ever tried tillandsia plants..give me some suggestion how to manage tillandsia.thanks

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    1. I have tried Tillandsia, but I have never successfully grown them. The best show I've had for my efforts has been when I stuck the plants in a glass case (a fish tank converted into a terrarium) and left them alone. The ambient humidity keeps them happy, but I haven't had any long enough to know when, how much, or what to feed them with.

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